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Jul 7, 2019 - Mind over Matter    Comments Off on How Old do you Think?

How Old do you Think?

Your true age is determined by your mental attitude, not the years you have lived.

The American clergyman and author Tyrone Edwards said, “Age does not depend upon years, but upon temperament and health. Some men are born old, and some never grow so.” No doubt you’ve known teenagers who were old before their time and seventy-year-olds who had the temperament and enthusiasm of those discovering the wonders of life for the very first time. It is all a matter of attitude.

As you grow and develop, make sure your experience is directed toward the acquisition of wisdom, not the acceptance of cynicism. If you find it difficult to keep an open mind because of previous experiences, remind yourself that you’re dealing with different people, that conditions have changed, or that because you are older and wiser, your chances of success are greater than in the past.

Don’t overlook small details. Remember that the universe and all that is in it are made from tiny atoms.

There is an old expression that says, “If you take care of the little things, the big things will take care of themselves.” It’s another way of saying that every job is composed of many small details, any one of which, if overlooked, can create big problems later.

If you have trouble dealing with details — paperwork, expense accounts, and other annoying details — set aside a time during your work cycle (daily, weekly, or monthly) to deal with such unpleasant tasks. Prepare yourself mentally to deal with those tasks, and you may find that you dispense with them quickly and efficiently. You may even find that the job wasn’t nearly as unpleasant as you expected it to be.

Its all a matter of Attitude!

Success comes to those who become success-conscious. Failure comes to those who indifferently allow themselves to become failure-conscious.